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BCWWA – Stormwater Applications for Lift Stations

Jim Baird – Romtec Utilities presents on Stormwater Management Solutions

More development means more:

  • Impervious services
  • watering and washing cars
  • more total urban runoff
  • difficult sites to service

Stomwater solutions have typically meant using gravity to get water away from developed areas and into detention ponds or waterways. But sometimes, sites require lift stations to prevent standing water:

Below Grade Rail Crossing (Chicago, IL).

  • A new rail overpass was built to separate grade, but this created a trap low point – a pump station was proposed.
  • Runoff is stored in box culverts, piped to pump station, then lifted 1000 feet to discharge sewer.
  • Monitoring of upstream discharge point to ensure that pumping did not flood upstream sewer, used box culvert as storage.
  • SCADA to general maintenance system.

Summer Runoff Diversion (Santa Barbara, CA)

  • Reduce summer runoff into Mission Creek, as concentrated pollutants in dry season runoff from irrigation, cars, and other point sources.
  • Divert this runoff to sewer treatment plant by installing lift station.
  • In winter there is lower concentration of pollution due to dilution.
  • lift station located in a busy residential street, right next to a house
  • Pre-packaged plant, quick to install (less than four days of traffic shut down start to finish), low visual impact

Eliminating Standing Water (Las Vegas, NV)

  • Adverse-to-grade condition left standing water in detention pond
  • health concerns mosquitoes and odour
  • lift station was an alternative to undertaking large pipe regrade project.
  • lets the gravity system do it’s thing, then pumps out the last of the water to storm sewer to prevent the standing water.
  • High traffic and cost of construction
  • minimize impact to surrounding community

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.