Skip to main content

Chicken Power

Forget solar power and wind, they are just too fickle. Biomass plants are nothing new, but converting hundreds of thousands of tons of chicken manure is…

Inhabitat » Chicken Manure to power 90,000 Homes in the Netherlands!

Situated in Moerdijk, the 150 million euro plant was constructed by the Dutch multi-utility company Delta. It will convert roughly 440,000 tons of chicken manure into energy annually, generating more than 270 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year. The plant also addresses a key environmental problem in the Netherlands: “managing the vast excess stream of chicken manure, which, until today, had to be processed at a high cost”.

Having heard of the massive groundwater pollution problems in the lower mainland of BC with chicken facilities and the disposal of manure, this seems like an ideal project to use the waste of the millions of birds kept in North America.

[ad#468]

In other chicken news…

Cluck Yes: Fort Collins Council Allows Urban Hens | FortCollinsNow.com

Chicken is back on the city menu. On Tuesday evening, the Fort Collins City Council voted 5-1 to allow residents to keep as many as six hens within city limits—purely for egg-laying and composting purposes, no slaughtering or roosters allowed.

The one councillor, Wade Troxell, who voted against this ruling sounds like a bit of a sourpuss, quoted as saying, “I think there’ll be neighborhoods that will be clearly upset because their quality of life will be degraded” and “I think barnyard animals don’t have a place in our neighborhoods”. What you think is contrary to the direction that many civilized places in North America are going. I’m glad that people get their say, but please inform your gentrified minds of the global, everyday realities of keeping animals in urban areas before you speak your mind.

Technorati Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.