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Climate Change and Health in BC

Many people I speak to around BC about Climate Change don’t realize how much research has been undertaken from a BC perspective on the impacts of Climate Change. For those of you who aren’t into reading lengthy government reports, check out the presentation series linked below. You will need to install a plugin to allow WebEx to run on your computer. I’ve watched the first presentation, where Stewart Cohen provides an overview of the Climate Change Situation in Rural and Remote British Columbia…

On June 26, 2009, the BC Rural and Remote Health Research Network and the BC Environmental and Occupational Health Research Network jointly hosted a research panel and networking event on Climate Change and Health in Rural and Remote British Columbia. Held at Simon Fraser University’s Wosk Centre for Dialogue in downtown Vancouver, the event was well attended, with over 70 participants, representing several BC universities (including the four PICS universities, Thompson Rivers University, Royal Roads University and the Justice Institute) and provincial government agencies, NGO’s and others concerned with health, environment, and social development. Participants who were unable to attend in Vancouver joined in remotely via WebEx, an online teleconferencing platform.

Source: Climate Change and Health in Rural and Remote BC

The most recent reports from Scientists are tending towards the upper end of the predictions made by the IPCC over the past couple of years. Sessions like the one linked above will become more common as the organizations throughout our society come to terms with the changes that are likely and imminent. If you have chance to watch and listen, let me know what you think, and which parts are the most useful.

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.