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Creating a Sustainability Journal

Last week I attended a conference with a great group of local Municipal leaders, and as might be expected given BC’s focus on Carbon Taxes and the like, much of the conversation revolved around sustainability and what we can do as individuals and communities to offset the damage we are doing to the environment.

The way we live our lives has grown out of a recent awareness of environmental consequences from our actions. An interesting exercise I came across last week was to compile a sustainability journal, (journals aren’t just for homeschooling geeks you know!). Here’s a snapshot of the post…

Take a few minutes to think of the actions you do now, and then think back just three years. Which of these describe you, and how were you different then?

•    You buy green power from your utility
•    You unplug electronics
•    You insulate your home to prevent energy loss
•    You take an annual home water audit and installed aerators
•    You drive less by biking, busing, or walking
•    You choose local foods and products
•    You eat less meat, and check the source of the fish you buy
•    Your recycling bins overflow, while your trashcan seems to always have room
•    You garden without chemicals, and use a push mower
•    You offset your flights

Sustainability journal: Week 1. Assembly, the first home energy entry, Portland energy savings | Portland, OR EcoMetro Live.

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This could be a good exercise to team up with New Years Resolutions and the like, and thinking about how our lives have changed in the past six years (three years is too recent for me), I can see that as a family we’ve reached a maturity of choices and actions, understanding the environmental and global impact of our choices, each and every one.

How have you changed since your sustainability awakening?

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.