Skip to main content

Free Calls with Gizmo Call

Capture 1-30-2007-9.59.14 AM.jpgOur family are pretty heavy users of Skype, we’re often calling Australia from Canada or cell phones or SMSing. The Gizmo Project has been around for a while now, offering a SIP compliant internet soft phone system. Today, Gizmo announced the release of their latest project an in-browser phone that loads a 900KB flash file to bring up the phone interface. Using this with a headset and broadband internet connection gives you five ten minutes free talk to anywhere in the world.

As an added incentive to your friends, you can even add call me links…
Gizmo Call

“Call Me” links allow you to share FREE calling through Gizmo Call with friends and family. Create a personalized “Call me” link that you can add to your website, email signature or blog. This way friends and family can call you for FREE with just 1-click.

Not sure how much I’d use it, but it may help broaden the acceptance of internet telephony. It’s certainly a step in the right direction.

Update: Here’s ReadWriteWeb’s take on the service…

Gizmo Call Launches, Browser-based VoIP

Right now I use SkypeOut (and also SkypeIn), but as a non-US user I usually have to pay for SkypeOut calls. So I will probably try Gizmo Call on a few short calls and, if the calling rates are lower than Skype and with no discernable loss in quality, I will probably switch. So beware Skype, the switching costs are pretty low in this industry, with so much hot competition in the VoIP arena. It certainly keeps Skype on their toes and pushes everyone to come up with free or low cost solutions for consumers. Note that it’s still relatively expensive to use these services if you don’t happen to be based in the US, so I’m looking forward to more price competition in VoIP-to-phone for international users. Bring it on!


Technorati : , , , , , , , ,

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.