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Koch Creek Hydro

Today I was sent a message by one of my readers about a public meeting being held regarding Koch Creek in the Slocan Valley, Kootenays BC.

FINAL PUBLIC MEETING
Koch Creek Hydroelectric Proposal
7:00PM, April 16th
Crescent Valley Hall

Come see what the proponents of this project are proposing… and come and tell them what you think about it…

The Friends of Koch Creek think it’s a bad idea.
Here are some of the reasons why:

We the people of British Columbia own Koch Creek and all the other threatened waterways in the West Kootenays and throughout the province. Under the current BC Energy Plan, private companies will profit from exploiting our publicly owned treasures with little or no benefit to the local economy.
The privatization of power generation in BC will lead to higher energy prices, less community control and a degraded environment. These projects are not about energy security. Once their sweetheart contracts with BC Hydro run out, private companies, not the people of BC, will own the right to sell the power to anyone they please.
This power is simply not needed. We do not have an energy crisis. Even if we did, we would need to be very thoughtful and to take time to examine how to proceed in the best possible ways. We must not be panicked into accepting shortsighted, "greenwash" solutions. To push these contracts through, the BC government has passed Bill 30, which takes away from all local governments all rights to have any say over what happens with these private power developments. Koch Creek Canyon is beautiful. We love it and propose it be designated as a park. It has the potential to lift the hearts of anyone who goes there. This is its real power potential.

Last summer was the first time I’d explored this beautiful area, unfortunately I witnessed a single vehicle accident and didn’t get any fishing in, but my family has a camping trip planned out this way this summer.

As this invitation states, these smaller scale hydro projects are not always as green as they seem, and the power to decide should be returned to the local government and the people who live in the surrounding communities.

Thanks Eva for this public notice.

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.