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Strategic Sustainability for Survival – Are You Ready for Change?

Strategic Sustainability for Survival. Out of all of the topics I’ve written about on at UrbanWorkbench, Sustainability ranks as the one I am most passionate about, not in a tree hugging hippy kind of way, but in response to the world around me.

What has prompted this series?

When looking at the lofty goals of many organizations when it comes to sustainability, I was struck by their naive optimism, a general feeling that if we make some small changes everything is going to be OK, maybe ban plastic shopping bags and incandecent light bulbs, reduce office paper wastage, but ignore the fact that you drive a gas guzzling vehicle everywhere to do anything!

This is the start of a series on Strategic Sustainability for Survival, specifically for the Kootenays, but relevant for the rest of the world as well. Many of the ideas tie together neatly, real estate values and sustainable housing; food security and agricultural clawback. All of them represent a future that we need to be prepared for and ready to adapt to.

There are several converging phenomenon occurring in the world today, which we will discuss through this series, and intersecting them all is the Peak Oil Theory. This is nothing new, it’s been around for decades under various names, but is only now being recognized as remotely possible by mainstream elements. Hit play to see this visual summary of what it means…

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Throughout the series, I’m aiming to touch on many different ideas, hopefully ones that you haven’t considered before, as well as ones that you’ll be able to teach me something about. Comments and suggestions are always welcome, and if you choose to post something on your blog about these topics, drop me an email to let me know about it.

Click through for the list of articles.

Strategic Sustainability for Survival – Are you ready for change?

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.