Skip to main content

Taxi Innovation

  A great little report on improving taxi services in downtown areas. Think of a mini taxi stand…

taxi design for the futurethat a person could walk up to, press a button and have a light pop-up for any taxi to see and for them to look for intrigued me with it’s beautiful simplicity. Taxis could also simply take a quick break in one of these to wait for a person to enter the taxi, preventing endless cruising around the city…

All it would take to have a safer, more convenient, high class taxi pick-up and drop-off system is giving up a few dozen free or metered parking spaces per neighborhood, which may be a nice side benefit in that it would reduce the incentive to drive to that area and take mass transit or walk instead.

Source: Streetsblog – Designing the Ideal Taxi Stand for New York City

more after the jump…

taxi design for the futureWhat about new forms of taxis, perhaps hybrid vehicles, (even yellow wheels)? Of course the report itself is all yellow, so be warned that you are entering a taxi zone. I don’t rely on taxis in Newcastle, apart from the occasional early morning trip to the airport, public transport and our one family car do all the work.

But in a city like Sydney or New York, innovations in transport modes must extend through to modes of transport like taxis, as with public transport. Buses and trains are getting smarter, why not taxis, there’s much more money to be made for the scale of investment compared with mass transit.

Would taxi companies buy into the idea of running smarter systems? Of course! The transition from 100% radio based communication to data screens; cash to EFTPOS, petrol to LPG, these changes have been readily adopted by the industry. 

To read the report, click here – Design Trust’s “Designing the Taxi,”.

[block:adsense=0]

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.