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The Power of Nature

Nature seems to be fighting back, with floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, drought, rising sea levels and everything else that is being thrown at humans.

I missed this story last November, not sure what I was up to but anyway, here’s a picture of a mine collapse due to extreme flooding.

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The more large scale projects humans attempt on the earth, whether it’s carbon dioxide, massive mono-crop farms, coal mines, or dams, the earth will bite back. Maybe the bite will not be any worse than events that have been seen previously, however, the human race is in a state of getting caught with our underwear flapping in the breeze. With all our eggs in large scale projects, the risks of disaster are no longer spread out over many sites, but can be felt by millions when a localized event occurs.

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The above mine collapse cut power to millions, busted the rail line and highway and risked pollution of the Latrobe River, which needed to be diverted to remediate the site. The cumulative risks of our activities are building up like a wobbly tower, one block on top of the other, just waiting for the final block that will topple the whole structure.

The whole world is at a precipice – which way will it fall? Some way or other we have to get back to a lower energy state – it’s where nature wants to be.

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.