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Tungle – the Scheduling Lifesaver

If you’d seen my desk lately, you’d understand how I feel about organization – I need it, but it doesn’t come easy. I’ve written previously about Xobni, another Outlook addin that helps sift through email madness, now it’s scheduling time.

Plans, proposals, phone call slips, reports, budgets, business cards – it’s all there – and the dream of the paperless office looks like a farce. Email is easy, and hides the disorganization that is inherent in Microsoft Office. For personal email, Google Apps rules the roost.And then there are the meetings. I have lots of meetings and need to stay on top of the when, where and what it;’s about, but also the scheduling – I don’t have a personal assistant to do that for me – and that is where Tungle comes in.

Setting up meetings with multiple attendees can be a challenge at the best of times, but with people using different email and calendar clients and leading busy lives, it only makes sense to use an online scheduling service like Tungle to ease the meeting timeslot troubles.

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It sits as a link on the Outlook Toolbar, or in Google Calendar and when scheduling is needed, click the button and tungle walks you through the process, looking at your contacts as you type in their names, pulling the existing information from your calendar, and once you’ve sent out the information, updating the calendar view with the availability of suggested attendees.

Tungle works with my existing calendars, both home and work, pulls contact information and provides an easy interface for respondents as well. Also, if you’re into publishing your free/busy status, this ties into LinkedIn, Facebook and other scoial networking sites, and you can even pop a widget on your blog too!

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.