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Water and Wastewater Blog – Water Meters

Guest blogging is a great way to build up readership and expose yourself to new audiences. Over the past ten months I have written occasionally for worldchanging.com and for the waterandwastewater dot com blogs and have had discussions with several others.

Today I posted another article on the waterandwastewater dot com blog, this time, tying into my recent post on water meters. As this blog has a wide range of readership, certainly wider than the Civil, Sustainability and Urban focus of this blog, and is in the specialist niche of water and wastewater, I’m hoping for some interesting comments on what I’ve written.

Water meters are a great tool for leak detection, demand management with an appropriate pricing structure and may even have benefits such as delaying infrastructure upgrades. But what do you do when there is a clean plentiful supply of water?

I’ve recently moved from the drought stricken climate of coastal Australia, where even public showers at the beach have been permanently shut off; to Castlegar, on the Columbia River valley in British Columbia, Canada.

Water and Wastewater Blog: Water Meters in a Bountiful Land

See the photo below for an example of the spring snow melt and dam release in our area, as well as a map of the rivers and dams around our city.

Brilliant Dam Panorama

Mike Thomas

Mike Thomas P.Eng. ENV SP, is the author of UrbanWorkbench.com and Director of Engineering at the City of Revelstoke in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. If I post something here that you find helpful as you navigate the world of engineering, planning and building communities, that’s wonderful. But when push comes to shove: This is my personal blog. The views expressed on these pages are mine alone and not those of my employer.