Shipping Returns to the Columbia River

Having missed the most exciting transportation and engineering event on the Columbia River for 2009. I’ll resort to relying on other people’s accounts of the journey. As an aside, this is an example of the use of traditional transportation methods in BC, a province of lakes, rivers and large mountain ranges. Last century there were even train barges on the lakes around here, as the steep shorelines prevented easy access for rail.

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First Nations Bridges of BC

The native population of British Columbia, collectively known today as the First Nations battled many of the same challenges we face today as communities in this great wilderness. The mountains, rivers, snow and spring freshet all made travel and transportation a challenge, and in many communities, still do. It is not uncommon to hear of commuities cut off by rock slides, avalanches, ice jams or flood waters in the late winter, early spring months. We don’t often think about what life was like before roads and cars, and we especially can’t imagine life without horses, carts and farm animals. But life as a native before the arrival of white man was not as simplistic as many of us would believe.

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Climate Change and Health in BC

Many people I speak to around BC about Climate Change don’t realize how much research has been undertaken from a BC perspective on the impacts of Climate Change. For those of you who aren’t into reading lengthy government reports, check out the presentation series linked below.

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Building Community

In times past, you couldn’t be an individual and live in a town or city. There wasn’t TV or the internet to distract us from the necessary task of making friends in a community. The community was the lifeboat you could trust to rescue, it was the means of commerce and service. It wasn’t just the group of people sharing a common location, it was a group of people sharing a common goal or set of ideals.

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