First Nations Bridges of BC

The native population of British Columbia, collectively known today as the First Nations battled many of the same challenges we face today as communities in this great wilderness. The mountains, rivers, snow and spring freshet all made travel and transportation a challenge, and in many communities, still do. It is not uncommon to hear of commuities cut off by rock slides, avalanches, ice jams or flood waters in the late winter, early spring months. We don’t often think about what life was like before roads and cars, and we especially can’t imagine life without horses, carts and farm animals. But life as a native before the arrival of white man was not as simplistic as many of us would believe.

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Castlegar Caught in the Middle

To catch everyone up on the story, Celgar, a subsidiary of Mercer International, runs the pulp mill locoated way out on the north western extremity of the City’s boundary, alongside the now closed Interfor lumber mill on the banks of the Columbia River at Hugh Keenlyside Dam.

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The Missing Number – Peak Oil

There is a sizable community of energy pundits who, after reviewing oil production records, believe that world oil production peaked last year (2008) at 81.73 million barrels of oil per day. Many in this community follow the discussion at a site called The Oil Drum, where no topic is off limits – as long as it relates to energy future, which if you haven’t worked out yet, just about everything we do or touch exists because of cheap abundant energy. Unfortunately, this number and the impacts on society, culture, the economy and development are being ignored by the media and the general population.

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Canada’s Sub-Prime Situation and Peak Oil

While the following article represents some of the least investigative of all investigative journalism that I’ve had the pleasure of…

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