Some dubious traffic statistics questioned

An interesting traffic discussion over at Rebuilding Place in the Urban Space. Richard had a set of figures on urban traffic densities, (rules of thumb), that he realised were not applicable to the project he was looking at, a freeway…

Rebuilding Place in the Urban Space: Freeway vehicle capacity

In spouting those mode capacity figures, while talking with the people who ambled by (and being questioned about the numbers!), I realized that the vehicle capacity numbers I knew weren’t relevant to the freeway part of I-66 (or the Wilson Bridge).

Prime Minister Announces Urban Stormwater Harvesting

Under a new plan unveiled by the Australian Prime Minister, John Howard, stormwater will be harvested in urban areas around Wyong, on the Central Coast of NSW, treated and re-introduced into the water cycle to maintain natural flows and water levels in the Porters Creek wetland area. This project comes at a cost of $16M, and involves a mix of local and federal government fund. From the Prime Minister’s Website:

Harvesting Stormwater to protect the Porters Creek Wetland – 23 August 2006:

I am pleased to announce that the Porters Creek Wetland Stormwater Harvesting project on the Central Coast of New South Wales is the eighth New South Wales project to receive funding from the Australian Government?s Water Smart Australia Programme. Wyong’s population is expected to increase by 40 000 by 2025. Australian Government funding of $2.6 million toward a $16 million investment will help protect a significant wetland area in NSW from stormwater that will flow from urban development in the catchment.

A Brief Argument Against Stormwater Pipes

Some History

Urban stormwater systems were historically designed to move water away from built up urban areas, using big lined channels and smooth pipes to quickly and efficiently remove this water to prevent flooding and inundation. As roof areas and impervious paving increased the volume of runoff increased and the need for efficient stormwater systems was born.

In today’s regulatory environment, there is still a definite bent toward the hard engineering forms of stormwater management , particularly pits and pipes, mainly because these systems remove the water from the roads and roofs quickly, maintaining safe driving surfaces and minimised downtime of any services or routes.

Converting Waves to Electricity

I love to hear about alternative power systems that use novel technologies or techniques to improve on existing methods of generation. I think BioPower Systems is one of those companies that has a really good idea, that needs to be heard. The technologies are pretty “simple, as they say, inspired by 3.8 Billion years of evolutionary optimisation.

BioPower Systems – Biologically Inspired Ocean Power Systems:

img_biowave.jpgBioPower Systems Pty. Ltd. is commercialising award-winning bio-mimetic ocean energy conversion technologies. We have adopted nature’s mechanisms for survival and energy conversion in the marine environment and have applied these in the development of our proprietary wave and tidal energy systems.

Our technologies inherit benefits developed during 3.8 Billion years of evolutionary optimisation in nature’s ocean laboratory.The resulting systems move and sway in tune with the forces of the ocean, and naturally streamline when extreme conditions prevail. This leads to low design thresholds and associated low costs.

The inherently simple bioWAVE” and bioSTREAM” devices are designed to supply utility-scale grid-connected renewable energy using lightweight modular systems. These systems will reside beneath the ocean surface, out of view, and in harmony with the living creatures that inspired their design.

The BioWave system mimics seaweed or kelp swaying in the current. As the wave action sways the fins back and forth, power is generated.

Newcastle Transport corridor for Sale

Imagine the headlines:

Newcastle Transport corridor for Sale

The State Rail Authority today announced the sale of the rail corridor land between Hamilton and Newcastle stations, freeing the way for Newcastle City Council and local developers to join the foreshore and the city at last. The Newcastle Rail Alliance and Hunter Rail Heritage groups have begun a joint legal challenge in the courts, but finding little support from the Novocastrians who travel into the city and harbour foreshore region for work and recreation.